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Cape Breton Highlands National Park – Rugged coasts & rare wildlife

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The drive to Cape Breton Highlands National Park https://goo.gl/Fip16k   As one drives from the serene fishing village of Grand Etang and approaches the inviting hills and jungles of Cape Breton Highlands National Park, it seems one is leaving civilization.  Driving a few minutes away from Cheticamp village, the sharply declining vehicular and human traffic, the increasing vegetation cover and the gradually undulating terrain, all indicated that the road ahead lead to a wilderness. I was excited. And I had reasons aplenty do so. I was driving on Cabot trail, so often described as North America’s most scenic highway. The sun was lucky on me even today, as it had been for the past few days, as I drove through countless pristine lakes, rolling farmlands and stunning mountains from southern Ontario to this edge of Atlantic Canada. And I was now approaching the most spectacular portion of this scenic Cabot trail drive - the Cape Breton Highlands National Park. Postcard-like pi

The gorgeous ocean views along Ceilidh Trail in Atlantic Canada's Nova Scotia province

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The drive from Halifax to Chetticamp via Inverness https://goo.gl/TCuXCb Day 6 Early next morning, I drove up to Truro again on Highway 2. I got the engine oil changed. The car had run smoothly till now, although it had topped 2,00,000 km lifetime mileage. From Truro, I drove straight to Canso Causeway, an artificially created land that connects mainland Nova Scotia to its northern part - the Cape Breton Island.  It was a warm afternoon, a welcome change from the cold Canadian winter as I drove over the Canso Causeway on the Trans-Canada highway and left mainland Canada into the beautiful Cape Breton Island. Canso Causeway is a raised path built over the Strait of Canso and is the world's deepest. At Port Hastings, the Island's entrance, the warm and friendly tourist staff gave me a good idea of the places I could see. The state tourism departments of Canada's maritime provinces have designated trails that give visitors a chance to drive through specific reg

Nature's marvel - the dramatic tides of Canada's Bay of Fundy

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The drive from Cape D' Or lighthouse to Halifax, capital of Nova Scotia province https://goo.gl/6Gj3dV I was back near Advocate Harbour at 2:50 PM, in time to watch the high tide. It was  an impressive sight. What was a couple of hours ago barren soil was no covered with over 10 feet of water. Boats that were aground were no either floating on water or were driven off by the fishermen, in search of their bread. The tides rise and fall each day, covering and uncovering land and rocks. The cycle of life goes on dictated by nature.  At Advocate Harbour, a board besides the road made me pull my car off the road. The board advised drivers to watch out for a 'Visually Impaired Child'. But coming from a society of one billion plus humans, it is tough for me to visualise a place where people are advised to take care of one solitary kid. It was something that I had never seen or heard in my life. One could only hope that I see such a thing in India at least once

Driving along the serene coastline of Nova Scotia- Canada's ocean playground

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The drive from Hopewell Rocks to the Cape D Ór light house https://goo.gl/1aizjT   Day 5 Early next morning I had a 'Oriental breakfast' and started for Nova Scotia province. I stopped at Amherst tourist info centre of Nova Scotia province, after getting lost in the maze of roads and bilingual signs on NB roads for a while.  I followed the Fundy Bay Ecotour drive along the Bay of Fundy again. After getting lost, I got help from a helpful driver in finding the directions to Joggins village. There is a good outlook of the Fundy village from a beach near this village, famous for 'beach combing'. People comb the beaches here in search of shells from pre-historic era. At Joggins village is a plaque dedicated to Canada's fallen soldiers in the world wars. I continued the journey south to Cape Chignecto. Though driving along the Bay, except for a couple of places including Sand Rivers, where the river entered the bay, the dense forest cover