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Jammu and Kashmir's wild east: The road south from Kargil town

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There are two roads that lead away from Kargil as one enters this sleepy town from Srinagar via Drass. The one south-east leads to Leh and is a very popular one, with many people these days driving or riding from Leh to Srinagar or vice versa. There is another road that goes south and then turns east and south again. That road leads to Padum, an important town in Ladakh region. View Larger Map For most part of the drive south, the road is along the banks of Kargil River. The River Suru is a tributary of River Indus and dominates much of Kargil District's landscape. The road is not as winding as roads generally are in the mountains untill it turns east into the Upper parts of the Suru Valley. The soil is loose and it might have helped the authorities in building the roads easily. All along the river bank are a string of small hamlets, that extend till it gets very cold up in the mountains. The lower valleys are cultivated while the peaks are permanently capped with s

Drive to Kargil from Zojilla Pass- Beauty of the Indian Himalayas

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A 'bakharwal (shepherd) walks in a valley beyond the Zojilla pass along Drass - Sonamarg road in Jammu and Kashmir State Click here to see the above map on googlemaps.com I visited Kashmir Valley and Kargil district, Ladakh region, in Jammu and Kashmir state between 6 - 11 July, 2009. The landscape of Ladakh is totally different from that of Kashmir Valley. The drive below is through some spectacular landscape. The landscape is dotted with 'Bakarwals', the nomadic grazers of Kashmir, as well as picturesque villages with the backdrop of glaciers and snow capped peaks. Along the way one can also see Tiger Hill, which was scene of fierce war between two subcontinent neighbours in 1999. The state of Jammu and Kashmir is vast and diverse. Even a week was not enough for me to capture the beauty of even its tiny part. Below are pictures taken during the drive from Zojilla Pass (where the Kashmir Valley ends) to Kargil town. If you observe, I have capture

Friends of Ranthambore

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Residents of Dungri Village, Dist Sawai Madhopur, Rajasthan. WWF-India has been working for quite a few years now with people around Ranthambore Tiger Reserve. It has been helping wean people of marginal communities from depending on forest resources. There have been many positive results with many villagers willing to walk with WWF-India to conserve Ranthambore's forests. View Larger Map A large number of people enter Ranthambore National park every day, mainly for religious purposes. Outside the park a large no: of people are dependant on it mainly for fuel wood. Seen here is a view in Dungri village, Khandar Tehsil, Sawai Madhopur District. Camel carts on a road adjoining the park boundaries. A women's self help group in Dungri village, Khandar Tehsil, Sawai Madhopur District. The group makes paper bags from used newspaper and sells it to newarby market. This way they save some money to use for domestic purpose. Earlier they used to cut fu

Of Ranthambore's Monitor Lizards and Crocodiles

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Apart from tigers and birds, there are many things that can be seen with ease in summer in Ranthambore National Park. Like, Crocodiles and Monitor Lizards. Below are some images of the same.

Some birds of Ranthambore

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Although Ranthambore National Park is known world over for its wild tigers, the park is also a haven for birds. Many of the birds here can be seen and photographed from close distances. This is particularly true in summers around water holes.